Bounty Description

Farm Share Bounty

Kings Hill Farm Winter Share Week 3   Welcome to the Winter Share! This information is meant to help you store your vegetables until use.  We’ve ordered this list starting with those you’ll want to use up first and moving down the list, root vegetables store nicely so storage times will vary depending on your set up. The refrigerator helps so much, but it is also the enemy when storing vegetables because it steals humidity. Most vegetables like humidity in the 60-90% range. When I mention storing in plastic bags, anything will do it doesn’t have to be a specific type. If you use ziplock type bags don’t seal it all the way as some air flow is good for the veggies. The longer you store your vegetables the more often you should check and see how they are doing. The classic old timey tradition was to sort through the stored veggies and cook up anything getting a little soft, wrinkly or spotty.  

Tokyo Bekana – This is an “Asian green” in the same family as arugula and kale but it’s very much its own vegetable. Has a nice mild flavor, and is technically a cabbage! We’ve eaten it a couple of ways, both chopped into a salad or added to a mixed veg sauté. Store in plastic for freshness.

Carrots- Nice sweet carrots that are frost sweetened. Our clay heavy soils make it hard for carrots to grow perfectly straight causing some variation in shapes.  Grate into a cole slaw, roast in a pan with a chicken or a quick crunchy snack. These will store for quite a while in the bag they came in in the refrigerator. Keep the bag folded over not tied! If they start to sprout at all its time to use them up. Our clay heavy soils make it hard for carrots to grow perfectly straight causing them to tend to look like legs.  Grate into a cole slaw, roast in a pan with a chicken or a quick crunchy snack. These will store for quite a while in the bag they came in in the refrigerator. Keep the bag folded over not tied! If they start to sprout at all its time to use them up.

Radish -  Purple Daikon - Smaller in size that traditional daikon’s but with the same elongated shape. Has a hint of the spicy flavor. We’ve enjoyed these in salad or kimchi or added to a stir fry.  Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator.

Purple Top Turnip – Mild in flavor is a hearty root vegetable that is perfect for stew. It will take on the flavor of any dish you add it to but hold its shape. These root crops do prefer a high humidity to keep crisp. Make sure the bag is folded over and not tied as some passive air flow is needed too. 

Cabbage- Classic green cabbage. Cabbage can be used in a myriad of ways. A new favorite of ours is cabbage “steaks” either wedges or whole slices covered in cooking oil, salt and pepper (plus any favorite spices) and placed on a roasting pan in the oven till tender. Since the oven is on throw some potatoes in there too. Makes a great side dish and super simple. This type of cabbage will store for a long time if kept in a bag to maintain freshness, any leaves that seem soft or old peel back to reveal the fresh interior.

  Potatoes – Red Norlands.  For shorter term storage, just keep roots in the 40- 60 F range and they can keep for many weeks until they begin to sprout or soften. Keep potatoes in the dark in opaque containers like paper bags or in a drawer or cupboard, as light will turn them green and cause them to sprout sooner. More humid conditions will keep them from shriveling. For longest term storage, keep under refrigeration, or similar conditions. However, if you refrigerate, take them out and allow to come to room temperature. This allows the starches to convert back to normal inside the potato. Potato starches turn to sugars in the cold. You can also eat them directly out of the fridge, though they may be sweeter and have a slightly different texture.  

Sweet Potatoes – Personal favorite of ours these are going to best for roasting. For the first time, we didn’t have a spectacular sweet potato year. A couple of points to note, their skins aren’t perfect and they are on the smaller / medium size. But we’ve been sampling to make sure they OK. Best use is peeled and oven roasted or sliced thin into a gratin or curry (or even pie!). These will store best at 55-65 degrees in a cupboard. They are a warm weather plant and don’t care to be refrigerated.   

Acorn Squash- The easiest way to cook squash, cut in half, scoop the seeds and bake at 350 in the oven until tender. You can then scoop out the tender squash and use for your recipe. Keep cool and dry for storage. Keep cool and dry. Traditionally squashes were kept under beds in the upstairs of farm houses where there was always above freezing temp, but not super-hot either. Optimal conditions are from 50-55 degrees with relative humidity of 50-70 percent. Most homes are a little drier than that, which may cause a little drying of the squash, but that is not a huge concern. Temperatures below 50 degrees will cause chilling injury to squash. If you see any spots forming it’s time to eat it!  

Onions & Garlic – Yellow storage onions & Red cippolini onions and garlic blubs (they come in the same bag). Red cippolinis can either be used like red onions Store in the bag they come in. Keep at room temperature in the kitchen for medium storage. They like it dry, and on the cooler side (32-50 F ideally, though kitchens work well for medium length keeping). Don’t put in plastic bags as humidity encourages sprouting. You can also keep small quantities in the kitchen and bulk amounts of garlic or onions in a cooler spot in mesh bags or containers that allow lots of airflow. Onions will eventually start to sprout, but you can then give them some light from a window and use the leaves that grow from the center as scallions in late winter sprout salads! Garlic will also keep well at room temp. in a dry area.  

Popcorn – Popcorn has great storage capabilities. Not that popcorn last very long in our house. But I’ve experimented with different lengths of storage and by year 2 you get fewer popped kernels but that’s it.  So, if you aren’t a huge popcorn eater never fear it will be fine in the cupboard for bit. Best stored in your cupboard in the container it came in. In the newsletter, I’ve linked different popcorn recipes.

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